Just between us

Pointe-Claire

Looking for takeout on your way home? How about Pasta Marois? You can pick it up in Pointe Claire

It was bound to happen, I suppose. And it is nice that it happened here in the West Island, stereotypes be damned. Enough is enough. Open-minded West Islanders should throw their support behind Henri Schick, the owner of the Swiss Vienna Pastry and Delicatessen in Pointe Claire Plaza who is taking a little shot at the OQLF. And he is doing it with a little sense of humour.

The growing backlash against the Office quebecois de la langue francaise is stirring resentment in all cultural communities. Pastagate, where the language inspectors targeted Italian words on a well-known Montreal restaurant, triggered the latest skirmish. Now, small business owners across the province who have been caught in the language inspectors’ crosshairs are pushing back and showing the world how ridiculous and petty the language laws have become in this province.

The Mouvement Quebec Francais has even come out and accused the anglo media of conspiring to publically humiliate the Office and openly disrespecting the province’s laws. Ouch.

Now, let’s analyze the Mouvement’s complaint. Enforcing a silly law is OK. But openly talking about it is not. Oh, and having an opinion about the law is not respectful either. Where are the violins when you need them?

If you want to respectfully show your support for the protest, why not swing by Schick’s shop off St. Jean Blvd. near Highway 20 on your way home tonight and pick up a little takeout. His Pasta salad Marois will make a nice side dish to just about any main dish and might even spark some interesting dinner table discussions.

Your comments are welcome.

Brenda O’Farrell

5 comments

  1. By David Keenan

    Good for them for standing up for basic rights. Anglos in Quebec are entitled to the same rights franco-ontarians demand in Ontario.

  2. By Christina Drolet

    The government should stop the language police from asking that pasta be removed from signs etc. immediately as
    today I received a flyer from the SAQ advertising white wines in a bold headline POUR L’AMOUR D d’UN BON PLAT DE PASTA translated as for the love of a good plate of pasta. How confused or stupied can they get . They approve the word pasta in the French language. What a waste of taxpayers money.

  3. Frankly, I don’t think the OQLF and Pauline Marois have gone far enough. Think of all the restaurants that have the word “Pizza” that needs to be changed to a more French sounding word. Heck, all the sign companies would make millions changing them over. But wait a minute… I just checked my Larousse dictionary, and the Italian word Pizza… is Pizza in French! It says so right on Page 405. Oh, that’s right… it was printed in France – the same place that uses words like “le parking” and “le shopping.”

    I’m kidding of course. Really.

    That said, there’s a resto in Lachine my fiancée and I patronize called “Pasta Andrea.” Somehow if they had to change it to “Pâtes Andrea”… it really doesn’t have the same ring to it. I certainly have never heard the mostly Quebecois clientele that patronize this lovely place – complain about their pasta, pizza or anything else for that matter!
    I guess on this one, the OQLF… bit off more than they can chew!

    Cheers,
    Frederic in Dorval

  4. By Infotrad

    The problem is that “Pasta Salad Marois” is neither English or French, if one goes by its syntax. I suggest that he at least decide on a language beforehand.

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